What To Do

Landmarks & Follies

ARKSEY
nr Doncaster
This interesting rural village is celebrated for its 17th-century almshouses and schoolhouse. All Saints Church restored by Sir George Gilbert Scott has a 13th century tower, medieval stained glass and a Fitzwilliam coat of arms.

ARNCLIFFE IN LITTONDALE
A virtually unspoilt village with old houses and barns surrounding a green. Old Cotes across the River Skirfare dates back to 1650. The bridge at Arncliffe probably replaced an earlier ford, and was of the utmost importance when Arncliffe church was the centre of one of Yorkshire’s largest parishes.

AUSTERFIELD & SCROOBY
nr Doncaster
These villages are famous not only for their beauty, but for thier connections with the pilgrim fathers. Also William Bradford was baptised at Austerfield church.

AUSTWICK AND NORBER
The village has several clapper bridges to be visited and Norber is internationally famous for its erratics.

BATLEY SHODDY TEMPLE
This title refers to the Central Chapel in Batley square. The word “shoddy” indicates a type of cloth produced from new wool and old rags. It is claimed that many “shoddy” deals were performed on the church steps after Sunday services.

BARNBURGH
nr Doncaster
Sir Percival Cresacre is reputed to have been killed by a wild cat in 1477 at the ‘Cat and Man’ church in Barnburgh. Opposite the church is a coaching inn. There is also a 17th century ginhouse and numerous stone cottages.

BAWTRY
Now a bustling market town, but previously a port on the River Idle. Nearby is a local woodland, kings Wood, which is very popular for its bluebells and chestnuts.

BEAMSLEY ALMSHOUSES
In 1593 the Countess of Cumberland individualised these almshouses by adding a circular hospital with a lantern topped conical roof. The shape was atered later by Lady Anne Clifford. There also exists a row of typical almshouses with gatehouse and chapel.

BECKERMONDS BRIDGE
This beautiful bridge marks the point at which the Wharfe is joined by Greenfield Beck.

BEGGARS BRIDGE
Glaisdale, North Yorkshire.
It is dated 1619 and bears the initials T.F. The story behind the initials is that a poor boy called Tom Ferris loved a rich girl named Agnes, and they met by the river, but the way was often slippery and occasionally they were unable to meet. When Tom became rich and married Agnes he built the bridge for future lovers.

BEVERLEY
The Cattle Market It is 400 years old and still held on Tuesdays and Wednesdays. The main market day is Wednesday and selling normally commences at 10am and concludes at 1pm. Charles Warton Hospital, Minster Moorgate. The Wartons were the local aristocrats, referred to as the ‘wealthy Wartons’. This almshouse, built in 1712, is one of their benefactions.

BRADFORD WOOL EXCHANGE
Built in 1867 this building is an illustration of the Venetian-Flemish Gothic style. It used to be said that on market days there was not one type of wool which could not be seen at the exchange. Statues at the Market Street entrance portray Bishop Blaize and Edward III. The highly decorated interior illustrates the wealth and pride of the nineteenth century textile kings.

BRAITHWELL
St James’s Church has many Medieval features and the methodist Chapel is one of the areas foremost dissenting chapel. The village cross is special because of the Norman inscription it bears.

BRONTE PARSONAGE
Haworth Home to the Bronte family from 1820 to 1861 this Georgian building is now a museum honouring the life and work of the Brontes. The Bronte parsonage holds many manuscripts, items of furniture and personal treasures.

BUCKDEN AND KETTLEWELL
Situated at the top most part of Wharfedale these villages deserve a visit. Hubberholme nr Buckden has an inn, some farms and a church with a rood loft and carved pews.

CAPTAIN COOK’S MONUMENT
Whitby
Built in 1827 on Easby Hill this monument affords a sepctacular view of the Cleveland Hills.

CASTLE HILL & JUBILEE TOWER
Off Lumb Lane, Almondbury, Huddersfield
Tel: (01484) 223830
This area has been occupied since the Stone Age and visitors can observe the Iron Age hill fort. The jewel in the crown is the Victoria Tower built 1898-99. The top of the tower provides spectacular views located as it is 1,000ft above sea level. There is also an exhibition tracing the hills 4,000 year history.

CATCLIFFE GLASS CONE
Rotherham
Dating from 1740 this is the oldest example of its kind in Western Europe. It is believed that prisoners of war were housed in it during the First World war, and midst the General Strike it was a canteen for children.

CLAPHAM
The Dales village holds a host of impressive buildings; Ingleborough Hall is now an outdoor pursuits centre, the church has a Victorian body, but ancient tower and Ingleborough Lake is also accesible on payment of a small fee. A walk out of the village will brind you to Ingleborouh cave and going on from here a walker can reach Gaping Gill; a pothole which has a main chamber the size of a cathedral.

CORN EXCHANGE
Leeds
Recently restored and an ideal place to find collectables.

COUNTY HALL
Wakefield
Tel: (01924) 306090
Built in the 1890’s to serve the West Riding County Council. This superbly decorated building now serves the City of Wakefield Metropolitan District Council.

COW AND CALF ROCKS
Ilkley
These gritstone crags are situated on the edge of the moor and are a pleasant walk from Ilkley’s town centre. The ‘cow’ is a sheer rock face of 50′. and the ‘calf’ is smaller.

CUP AND RING MARKED ROCKS
Ilkley. This denotes a circular hollow surrounded by a ring/rings. Many of these carved rocks can be found within Britain and are associated with Bronze Age Burials. There is a walk which takes in most of these carvings around Ilkley, and a map can be obtained from the Tourist Information Centre.

DENT TOWN
North Dales village containing a historic church, white washed houses, a cobbled street and a memorial to Adam Sedgwick.

FIVE RISE LOCKS
Bingley
A staircase of locks which raises boats 59 feet over a distance of 320′. A spectaular site on the Leeds and Liverpool canal.

FLAMBOROUGH LIGHTHOUSE
The present lighthouse was constructed in 1895 replacing two previous ones; one of1852 and the other of 1776. Not only is the lighthouse 120ft high, but as the coast moves so does the lighthouse.

FRIARY GATEWAY
Eastgate, York
In 1964 the 16th century gateway of the Friary was incorporatd into the garden wall of the old vicarage.

FYLINGDALES EARLY WARNING STATION
In 1992 this replaced the trio of golf balls to act as an early warning system scanning for missiles, satellites and other objects.

GRAND THEATRE
Leeds
Tel: 0113 244 3509
The Grand Theatre and Opera House is the traditional base for Opera North, also mainstream drama, west end musicals and ballet.

GRINTON BRIDGE
An important link in the Dales. It’s influence was at its height when Grinton market occured on a Sunday, enabling people to both attend church and buy their necessary provisions.

HAMPOLE AND SKELBROOKE
Hampole is famous as the home of Richard Rolle the father of English vernacular literature. Whilst at Skelbrooke stands Robin Hood’s Well created by John Vanbrugh, the architect of castle Howard.

HAWES and HARDRAW
Hawes has its market day on Tuesday, and Hardraw contains the spectacular Hardraw force; a 100 ft waterfall leaping from a magnificent cliff.

HAWORTH MAIN STREET
Surfaced with stone setts which were meant to provide the horses pulling laden carts with a good grip. The flanking houses have no front gardens, but are built right next to the street and due to the steep gradient they have certain individual features. Homes of hand loom weavers are easily spotted by their third storey and long narrow windows.

HEBDEN BRIDGE
The houses in Hebden Bridge are of relatively recent construction due to mechanisation. In the 18th century hand looms were replaced by water powered spinning machines. Due to the lack of space top to bottom terraces were built on the steep valley sides. These were divided down the terrace’s axis therefore the houses on one side opened on a different level to the houses on the other. The largest house at the end of each row was the foreman’s.

HIGHGATE HOUSE
Beverley
This Georgian house is half the original building since part of it was destroyed to allow for Lord Roberts Road in 1909.

HOLBECK EGYPTIAN MILL
John Marshall manufactured the production of linen from the flax plant and built various mills. He was followed into business by his son; John. Ultimately another son, James, took over and built the famous Temple Mill. Celebrated due to its exterior which was designed by Joseph Bonomi. He had been influenced by Egyptian architecture and the mill was decorated with ancient Egyptian columns and motifs.

HOOBER STAND
Rotherham
A 100ft monument erected at the highest point in the borough to celebrate the defeat of the Jacobite rebellion.

HOOTON PAGNELL
The buildings are made of local brown limestone and located on a ridge which provides superb views of the Dearne Valley. There is also an ancient hall with a 14th-century gateway.

HORKSTOW BRIDGE
One of the world’s oldest suspension bridges. Built 1835-36 by Sir John Rennie it is a delightfully ornate brick bridge.

HORTON-IN-RIBBLESDALE and PENYGHENT
Horton church with its air of antiquity also has a window in the tower which displays the mitred head of Thomas a Becket. A well marked stretch of the Pennine way may be followed to the summit of Penyghent (694m.)

HUDDERSFIELD RAILWAY STATION
J P Pritchett the elder designed Huddersfield Railway Station in 1847-48. It is constructed in the classical Corinthian style and has a facade 416ft long. In the centre stands an eight columned pediment portico with columns 68ft high. Flanking this central building are two long wings with smaller porticos which carry medallions with the two coats of arms of the founding railway companies.

HUMBER BRIDGE
The longest single suspension bridge in the world

HUTTON-LE-HOLE
This village offers the typical view of the Dales with its limestone cottages, greens and beck crossed by numerous white footbridges. Hutton-le-Hole is influenced by its strong seventeenth and eighteenth century Quaker inhabitants. In the nineteenth century the village became home to Rosedale miners who altered the village’s atmosphere due to their penchant for bare knuckle fights. Nowadays, it is the Ryedale Folk Museum which is Hutton-le-hole’s top attraction with its reconstructed vernacular buildings

HUSKAR PIT MEMORIAL
Barnsley
The area’s mining history is perforated by tragedy and Silkstone churchyard testifies to that. It is hear that a memorial marks the graves of 26 children killed in the Husker pit tragedy.

INGLETON GLEN AND WHITE SCAR CAVE
The entrance to the glen is well signposted, but a comprehensive guidebook can be purchased. White Scar cave with its large chamber of stalactites can be entered from the Chapel-Le-Dale road B6255.

IVELET BRIDGE
A humpbacked packhorse bridge which was once important because it stood on the route of packponies transporting wool, lead and stone. However, it is now protected and preserved as a symbol of a past age.

KEPPELS COLUMN
Rotherham
A 115ft high column commemorates the acquital of Admiral Keppel who was court martialled for failing to defeat the French in a battle in 1778.

KETTLEWELL BRIDGE
Kettlewell’s primary bridge is that over the Wharfe, but it is also glorified with many smaller bridges which straddle streams originating from Great Whernside.

KIRKBY LONSDALE
A traditional market town with a large church and a ribbed medieval bridge.

LEEDS TOWN HALL
A magnificent Victorian building with a baroque clock tower and massive stone lions.

LEEDS VICTORIAN QUARTER
Refurbished arcades and covered streets with pavement cafes and designer shops. Also large Edwardian indoor market Monday-Saturday early closing Wednesday. Open market Tuesday, Friday, Saturday and Secondhand market Thursday.

LENDAL BRIDGE
York
In 1836, due to an increase of traffic caused by the creation of a railway station at York, Lendal Bridge was built. The bridge replaced an earlier ferry service. Until 1894 tolls were charged for crossing the bridge in order to pay for the cost of building. Library and Art Gallery, Beverley. Between exhibitions the collection of works by F W Elwell R A are on display. Opening Times: Art Gallery daily 10am-4.30pm.

LITTLE GERMANY
Bradford
Bradford was once the centre of Yorkshire’s booming woolen industry and certain buildings remain as a symbol of this era. “Little Germany” refers to the focal point of Bradford’s wool merchanting. The name developed because many German merchants settled here and between 1852-1874 these merchants built thirty “palace warehouses” to receive and dispose of piece goods, yarn and wool. These warehouses were also architecturally influenced by Italy

MALHAM COVE & TARN
nr Malham Village
At the bottom of a 300ft wall of limestone, previously a waterfall, Malham Beck emerges.The tarn itself is a nature reserve and a bird sanctuary.

MALHAMDALE
The National Park Information centre is very useful. Walks can be taken to Malham Cove, Gordale Scar or Janet’s Foss waterfall. Market Cross, Beverley. Constructed in 1711-1714 to replace an earlier one. The Arms of Sir Charles Hotham and Sir Michael Warton,as well as those of Queen Anne and Beverley, are displayed on the cross.

MERCHANT ADVENTURERS HALL
York
Home to the most powerful York guild and the biggest timber framed building in the city. The Great Hall is simply stunning with its timber roof, Elizabethan panelling and uneven planked floor. It is also decorated by banners and portraits of old masters. The building originated as a religious institution in1357, hence the undercroft with the Trinity Chapel, but business soon became its primary function.

MOTHER SHIPTON’S CAVE
Address: Prophecy Lodge, High Bridge, Knaresborough, HG5 8DD
Telephone: 01423 864600
England’s oldest visitor attraction, open since 1630. Discover the story of famous Tudor prophetess Mother Shipton, and see the Petrifying Well where cascading waters turn everyday items to stone. Scenic park with picnic areas, adventure playground, museum and gift shop.

NEEDLE’S EYE
Rotherham
A tower with a stone urn on top which is pierced by a carriageway. Legend states that it was constructed in response to a wager by the Marquis of Rockingham to drive a horse and carriage through the eye of a needle.
North Bar, Beverley. The only survivor of five medieval gates. It was rebuilt 1409-1410. The connecting bar houses was occupied by a celebrated local artist F W Elwell R.A. A permanent collection of his work resides at the Beverley Art Gallery.

OAKWORTH RAILWAY STATION
A superb Victorian station which is on the Keighley and Worth Valley Steam Railway. It is here that “The Railway Children” was set.

PIECE HALL
Halifax
The Piece Hall is where weavers working in the surrounding cottage industries displayed their cloth to wool merchants who came to observe and buy. This building resembles an Italian Piazza with its three storeys of colonnaded galleries built around a central quadrangle. In 1871 the Piece Hall was converted to a market for fruit and vegetable since the coming of the factories had decreased the buildings necessity.

PONTEFRACT BUTTER CROSS
Located in Pontefract’s market place stands the Butter Cross which provided shelter for people selling dairy products. It was constructed in 1734 by the widow of Solomon Dupier; previously a member of Gibraltar’s Spanish Garrison.

RALPH CROSS
On the summit Ralph cross marks the boundary of Pickering Lythe and the junction of four roads.

RIBBLEHEAD VIADUCT
An impressive and spectacular part of the Settle-Carlisle railway. A £3 million restoration is commemorated by a memorial near to pillar 13 of the viaduct.

RICHMOND CASTLE & SQUARE
Richmond has one of the largest market places in the county and is dominated by an eleventh century castle. The Keep of which was added on to the gatehouse a hundred years later by Henry II. The Keep is one hundred feet high and has walls eleven feet thick. The castle remains in remarkable condition primarily because it never experienced a siege.

RIPLEY VILLAGE
Ripley village was rebuilt in 1827-28 by Sir William Ingilby who constructed it in local stone and based it upon a village in Alsace-Lorraine. The village hall was extensively decorated and called the Hotel de Ville. Ripley is also famous for its weeping cross. Around the base of which are eight niches either for offerings or for penitents to kneel in and pray. Ripley was also a market town with its own stepped cross. It was on the bottom step that miscreants locked in the stocks sat.

ROBIN HOOD’S BAY
This town has a number of Victorian and Edwardian houses built for shipowners and signalling its connection with the sea. The history of Robin Hood’s Bay has also closely connected it to smuggling. Robin Hood’s Bay is famous for its houses which are built on steep streets and have consequently lead to the development of the coffin window; due to the winding nature of the staircases in these houses this window was evolved at landing level in order to aid the removal of coffins.

ROYAL PUMP ROOM MUSEUM
Harrogate
Harrogate’s fame is founded primarily upon the discovery in 1571 of a mineral spring which coincided well with the general belief that four pints a day of sulphur water would cure most ailments. The museum itself illustrates the development of Harrogate as the Queen of Inland Spas.

ROYAL BATH ASSEMBLY ROOMS
Harrogate
Once one of the world’s largest hydrotherapy centres, but now simply reminiscent of older, grander days.

SALTAIRE
Bradford
This industrial hamlet has a very individual air. Now a conservation area. but previously the whole settlement, built in the nineteenth century by Sir Titus Salt, was a model village for the workers at his alpaca mill. The enormous Salts Mill dwarfs Saltaire’s houses.

SEDGWICK STONE
Dent
Adam Sedgwick (1785-1873) ,a former pupil of Dent grammar school and Woodwardian professor of geology at Cambridge, is commemorated in this small village by a slab of pink granite which is positioned alongside the main street.

SETTLE, THE FOLLY
A brief walk from the market place brings you to The Folly. A house left unfinished because the builder couldn’t afford to complete it. Oddly some of the windows are set at the corners of the building. Part of The Folly is to be converted to a folk museum.

SHAMBLES
York
Walk down The Shambles from the southeast corner of the square and experience Elizabethan York with its half timbered houses This well preserved medieval street was once called Fleshammels due to the butchers shops along it. Nowadays it is an extremely pleasant shopping area.

SKELDALE HOUSE
Askrigg
Askrigg, formerly a market town, is closely connected with the James Herriot’s series “All Creatures Great And Small” since the exterior of a house near the church became known as Skeldale House where the veterinary practice was located.

SKIPTON AND EMBSAY
Skipton has a large and busy market, a parish church, the resting place of the Cliffords, and a splendid castle. At Embsay is another steam railway.

STAITHES
This village is an interesting mixture of bungalows, housing estates and ironsone-mine cottages. However, in the old village the cottages are crammed closely into the cliff and the road eventually leads to the harbour and the sea.

STAITHES BRIDGE
Staithes footbridge leads to a very beautiful viewpoint where spectacular pictures of this incredible village can be taken.

STAINFORTH BRIDGE
This packhorse bridge joins Great Stainforth and Little Stainforth. It was built by the monks from Sawley Abbey and may even have been constructed before the 14th century.

STUMP CROSS CAVERNS
Pateley Bridge
Tel: 01756 752780
A specatacular series of underground caverns with exceptional stalactites and stalagmites which are lit with coloured lighting. Also including a new visitor centre, cafe and shop.

ST WILLIAMS COLLEGE
York
Now the Minster’s Visitor Centre, but previously the home to chantry priests. The dissolution of the Monasteries saw St Williams transferred into privated hands, particularly Charles I who established his printing press here in 1641. In 1906, however, it was sold back to the church and remained in use for religious purposes until 1959.

SWALEDALE BARNS
Characteristic of Swaledale are the numerous small barns found in the fields and used to house animals.

THORNE
Established as a settlement in Anglo-Saxon times and now a thriving market town. The features of this agricultural area were created by Vermuyden.

TICKHILL
The Norman Castle and 18th century Buttercross decorate this town which is situated in picturesque surroundings.

TOWTON MEMORIAL
This cross commemorates the Battle of Towton on Palm Sunday in 1461.

UNDERCLIFFE CEMETRY’S NEOCROPOLIS
Located on a hillside overlooking Bradford’s mills this cemetry posseses a Victorian atmosphere. It is the central boulevard which is most impressive, dominated as it is with examples of wealth; such as the Illingworth Mausoleum with its sphinxes and Egyptian style. However, the burial plots of the poor offer a contrasting view and illustrate the great divide between wealth and poverty.

WAINHOUSE TOWER
Halifax
Dating from 1871 this folly stands 275ft high. Primarily designed as a chimney to carry away the smoke from J E Wainhouse’s Washer Lane Dyeworks. When Wainhouse sold the factory the chimney was unfinished and was later completed as a decorative belvedere and look out tower. After Wainhouses death the bottom six feet were used as a henhouse and in World War II it was occasionally used by the military as an observation tower.

WAKEFIELD TOWN HALL
Wood Street
Tel: (01924) 306090
Opened in 1880 this splendid Victorian Town Hall was substantially refurbished in 1988 to provide a conference, banqueting and restaurant complex.

WHALEBONE ARCH
Whitby
This outlines views of the abbey and church, and the plaque upon the arch describes the whaling industry 1753-1837.

WHARFEDALE AND BOLTON ABBEY
In the upper dale, Grassington is the major town, and Bolton Abbey is particularly interesting.

WHITBY SWING BRIDGE
It separartes the upper and lower harbours and holds the two sides of the town together. Whitby Swing Bridge was opened in 1909 and is the fifth bridge on or near this site. It is Britains only swing bridge with two moveable leaves.

WYCOLLER COUNTRY PARK
This hamlet near Keighley has a beck and several bridges, a restored barn and the remains of a hall known to the Brontes.

YORK BARS, BOOTHAM & MICKLEGATE
York
Not places selling alcohol, but gateways to York. Bootham bar stands at the western entrance to Roman York and Micklegate Bar is the royal entrance. The latter was probably built in the twelfth to fourteenth centuries covering a track leading down to the River Ouse. Micklegate Bar was also honoured by bearing spiked heads for example the Duke of York during the Wars of the Roses.

The information on this page was believed to be correct at the time of compilation. Dalesman cannot be held responsible for any errors or changes. Contact numbers are given where known so that details can be checked before embarking on any journey.